Ingest

DEFINITION: A digital archival repository that complies with ISO 14721 (LINK) has the capability to systematically Ingest(receive and accept) electronic records from records producing units in the form of Submission Information Packages (SIPs), move them to a staging area where virus checks and content and format validations are performed, transform electronic records into designated preservation formats as appropriate, extract metadata from SIPs and write it to Preservation Description Information (PDI), creates Archival Information Packages (AIPs), and transfer the AIPs to the repository’s storage function. This process is considered the minimal workflow for transferring records into a digital archival repository for long-term preservation and access.

 
 Level 0   The Archives/RM unit does not currently accession or ingest electronic records.
 Level 1

Level 1a: The Archives/RM unit ingests any available electronic records from records producing units in any format, but assumes only the responsibility to keep the bit stream alive. 

Level 1b: The archival repository ingests partially conforming ISO 14721 SIPs. 

 Level 2

Level 2a: Partially conforming ISO 14721 SIPs are ingested and held in a staging area while virus checks and format validations are manually executed. 

Level 2b: Partially conforming ISO 14721 AIPs are manually transferred from a staging area to archival storage. 

 Level 3

Level 3a: Fully conforming ISO 14721 SIPs are ingested and checked for virus and format validations with semi-automated tools. 

Level 3b: Fully conforming ISO 14721 AIPs are produced and transferred to archival storage through semi-automated tools. 

 Level 4 Level 4a: Fully conforming ISO 14721 SIPs are ingested and automatically checked for virus and format validations.

Level 4b: Fully conforming ISO 14721 AIPs are automatically produced and transferred to archival storage.

 

Resources

Resources associated with the Ingest Framework element assist with providing background information and useful examples that can be consulted when trying to setup best practices for ingesting digital materials.

Definition

A digital archival repository that conforms with ISO 14721/ISO 16363 has the capability to systematically Ingest (receive and accept) electronic records from records producing units in the form of Submission Information Packages (SIPs), move them to a staging area where virus checks and content and format validations are performed, transform electronic records into designated preservation formats as appropriate, extract metadata from SIPs and write it to Preservation Description Information (PDI), creates Archival Information Packages (AIPs), and transfer the AIPs to the repository’s storage function.

This process is considered the minimal workflow for transferring records into a digital archival repository for long-term preservation and access.

Level 0

The Archives/RM unit does not currently accession or ingest electronic records.

Move to Level 1: Begin to accept electronic records in any format with the responsibility to keep the bit stream alive. [1a]  Ingest these records as partially conforming SIPS.  [1b]

Jump to Level 2: Partially conforming  SIPs are ingested and held in a staging area for virus checking and format validations in which the process is manually executed. [2a] Created AIPs are then manually transferred to an archival storage area. [2b]

 

Level 1a

The Archives/RM unit ingests any available electronic records from records producing units in any format, but assumes only the responsibility to keep the bit stream alive.

Level 1b

The archival repository ingests partially conforming ISO 14721 SIPs.

Move to Level 2: Partially conforming SIPs are ingested and held in a staging area for virus checking and format validations in which the process is manually executed. [2a] Created AIPs are then manually transferred to an archival storage area. [2b]

Jump to Level 3: Fully conforming SIPs are ingested and checked for virus and format validations with semi-automated tools, creating conforming AIPS that are transferred to archival storage semi-automatically.

Level 2a

Partially conforming ISO 14721 SIPs are ingested and held in a staging area while virus checks and format validations are manually executed.

Level 2b

Partially conforming ISO 14721 AIPs are manually transferred from a staging area to archival storage.

Move to Level 3:  Fully conforming SIPs are ingested and checked for virus and format validations with semi-automated tools [3a], creating conforming AIPS that are transferred to archival storage semi-automatically. [3b]

Jump to Level 4: Fully conforming SIPs are ingested and automatically checked for virus and formats are validated [4a]. In addition fully conforming AIPS are produced and transferred to archival storage automatically.

Level 3

Fully conforming ISO 14721 SIPs are ingested and checked for virus and format validations with semi-automated tools.

Level 3b

Fully conforming ISO 14721 AIPs are produced and transferred to archival storage through semi-automated tools.

Move to Level 4: Fully conforming SIPs are ingested and automatically checked for virus and formats are validated [4a]. In addition fully conforming AIPS are produced and transferred to archival storage automatically.

Level 4a

Fully conforming ISO 14721 SIPs are ingested and automatically checked for virus and format validations.

Level 4b

Fully conforming ISO 14721 AIPs are automatically produced and transferred to archival storage.

 

Helpful Hints

Something to Consider

  • Level 1 includes using bit-level preservation such as keeping redundant copies of the digital content on different types of media in different geographic locations, using checksums to verify the integrity of the content over time, and when appropriate migrate the digital content to newer media.
  • Reaching Level 4 for most organizations will be a challenge; not everyone will be able to have 'fully compliant' SIPs and AIPs. The thing to keep in mind is that there are best practice steps that you can follow - the more the better.  
  • In some cases it may be more appropriate to print electronic records for long-term management of the materials.  Consider the return on investment for preserving the digital copy vs a paper copy.  The time and energy spent to ingest, process, and care for the digital materials must be worth the effort.  [This will not be appropriate in all cases.] As one state archives states: "When I receive minutes from a board or commission on a disk or in an email, I print them and file them the old way."

Definitions

  • Archival Information Package (AIP): An Information Package, consisting of the Content Information and the associated Preservation Description Information (PDI), which is preserved within a system. The AIP often consists of the original files deposited, processed versions of data files and documentation, normalized files, and associated metadata. (University of Illinois AIP Structure example.)
  • Submission Information Package (SIP): An information package that is delivered by the producer to the open archival information system for use in the construction of one or more archival information packages.  [In other words, it is the information that is submitted to the archives. The SIP contains both the Content Information, which is the original digital records, plus Representative Information, such as metadata required to manage the object over time.  Your repository will need to determine what information will be needed over time to manage the digital object long-term.]

Referenced Standards

  • ISO 14721: Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System (OAIS)

Specific Resources

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